Speak Lord: Of the way of humility

Living Eucharist

Canon T. Major LesterThe Gospel reading on Sunday, the 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, invites us to humility, and an openness to those who are regularly marginalised.

The Kingdom has rules and perspectives very different to those of the world.

On a sabbath day Jesus had gone for a meal to the house of one of the leading Pharisees; and they watched him closely. He then told the guests a parable, because he had noticed how they picked the places of honour.

He said this, ‘When someone invites you to a wedding feast, do not take your seat in the place of honour. A more distinguished person than you may have been invited, and the person who invited you both may come and say, “Give up your place to this man.” And then, to your embarrassment, you would have to go and take the lowest place. No; when you are a guest, make…

View original post 182 more words

Taste and see: Training

Living Eucharist

Olympic rings

The second reading at Mass on Sunday, the 21st Sunday in Ordinary Time, was taken from the Letter to the Hebrews. The Letter as whole offers an opportunity for a taking stock on what it means to be faithful, to be chosen, to be Christian, especially at a time of trial.

Have you forgotten that encouraging text in which you are addressed as sons? My son, when the Lord corrects you, do not treat it lightly; but do not get discouraged when he reprimands you. For the Lord trains the ones that he loves and he punishes all those that he acknowledges as his sons. Suffering is part of your training; God is treating you as his sons. Has there ever been any son whose father did not train him? Of course, any punishment is most painful at the time, and far from pleasant; but later, in those on whom it has been…

View original post 178 more words

Taste and See: as one people

Living Eucharist

Jerusalem 2The Psalm at Mass on Sunday, the 21st Sunday in Ordinary time, briefly and firmly calls us to praise of God and to confidence in God’s love for us, his people.

Go out to the whole world; proclaim the Good News.

O praise the Lord, all you nations,
acclaim him all you peoples!

Go out to the whole world; proclaim the Good News.

Strong is his love for us;
he is faithful for ever.

Go out to the whole world; proclaim the Good News.

Psalm 116:1-2

A psalm from the Jewish Scriptures, and also the word of God for Christians, it is a prayer and song that all believers in the one God might sing with joy and assurance.

In this song the family of God, who know God as God, can join in a common song, despite difference of religion, faith, culture, language, whatever.

  •  In prayer today pray the…

View original post 17 more words

Your Gift

DarylMadden

What a true blessing
To show that you care
Through God given talents
A gift that you share

Of your dedication
No need to ask
You sacrificed time
And completed the task

Not one we deserve
So grateful are we
Can’t thank you enough
God flowing through thee

One of pure beauty
Born in His name
A call has been answer
A light that we claim

A simple reflection
Like mercy and grace
Of something unearned
A joy we embrace

A gift we’ll enjoy
Give thanks up above
A gift of eternal
One of His love

View original post

Taste and See: newness

Living Eucharist

door alyscamps

Yesterday was the 21st Sunday in Ordinary Time, and the Gospel encouraged us to a new attentiveness about how we live: the we might live faithfully, fruitfully, well.

Through towns and villages Jesus went teaching, making his way to Jerusalem. Someone said to him, ‘Sir, will there be only a few saved?’ He said to them, ‘Try your best to enter by the narrow door, because, I tell you, many will try to enter and will not succeed.

‘Once the master of the house has got up and locked the door, you may find yourself knocking on the door, saying, “Lord, open to us” but he will answer, “I do not know where you come from.” Then you will find yourself saying, “We once ate and drank in your company; you taught in our streets” but he will reply, “I do not know where you come from. Away from me…

View original post 168 more words

Speak Lord: Make us one

Living Eucharist

Nativity, LiverpoolThe first reading at Mass today offers an inclusive vision of God;’s blessing of Israel – this is a blessing to share with the whole world. Jerusalem may have been asked by its conquerors and its people dispersed. But there will be not restitution but restoration; and the blessing of one people will prove to be blessing for the whole world.

The prophesy made through Isaiah is understood in the Christian tradition as a foretelling of the gift of Christ and the good news of the Kingdom.

The Lord says this: I am coming to gather the nations of every language. They shall come to witness my glory. I will give them a sign and send some of their survivors to the nations: to Tarshish, Put, Lud, Moshech, Rosh, Tubal, and Javan, to the distant islands that have never heard of me or seen my glory. They will proclaim my glory to…

View original post 151 more words

Speak Lord: Our praise

Living Eucharist

Creation 6 and 7

The Psalm at Mass tomorrow, the 21st Sunday in Ordinary time, is a delightfully short psalm. It is a model of concision and assurance, both in the call it makes to the people and in its own proclamation of God’s love.

Go out to the whole world; proclaim the Good News.

O praise the Lord, all you nations,
acclaim him all you peoples!

Go out to the whole world; proclaim the Good News.

Strong is his love for us;
he is faithful for ever.

Go out to the whole world; proclaim the Good News.

Psalm 116:1-2

We are all too familiar with bad news and that bad news can often constrain and diminish us. It can depress us and can restrict our ability to be fully human,  respond with unconstructive anger, or to become despondent, cynical, and (seem to) fail to respond at all.

The way of Christ, though sometimes…

View original post 77 more words

Speak Lord: gently

Living Eucharist

St Peter getting our of the boat, Peterborough CathedralThe second reading at Mass on Sunday, the 21st Sunday in Ordinary Time, comes from the Letter to the Hebrews.

Have you forgotten that encouraging text in which you are addressed as sons? My son, when the Lord corrects you, do not treat it lightly; but do not get discouraged when he reprimands you. For the Lord trains the ones that he loves and he punishes all those that he acknowledges as his sons. Suffering is part of your training; God is treating you as his sons. Has there ever been any son whose father did not train him? Of course, any punishment is most painful at the time, and far from pleasant; but later, in those on whom it has been used, it bears fruit in peace and goodness. So hold up your limp arms and steady your trembling knees and smooth out the path you tread; then the injured limb…

View original post 175 more words

Congratulations to Bishop Walsh staff and students on this year’s A level results


Once again year 13 students at Bishop Walsh Catholic School celebrate great A level results. Average point score per entry was 220 and for the sixth year consecutively 50% of results were at grades A*, A or B.    ‘Bishop Walsh has such a dynamic Sixth Form and I am so proud of our students this year,’ said John Farrell, Principal at the school in Wylde Green Rd which is part of the St. John Paul II Multi-Academy. ‘Congratulations go to all those who have understood the value of hard work. Students can be really excited about their future as these results have given them so much choice in their career paths.  
Students have done so well with the support of their parents and teachers. Sean Duignan was best in his year obtaining 4A*s and will read Mathematics at Bristol University. David Middlemass obtained 3A* and will train to be a doctor at Nottingham University while Jamie Odyniec also obtained 3A*s and will read Mathematics at Warwick University. We are delighted that Sam Gregory gained a distinction star and a distinction in his Level 3 BTEC courses and will pursue Higher Education at Matthew Boulton College here in our own City of Birmingham. Caitlin Clancy obtained 2A*s and 2As at A level and is off to read Mathematics at Nottingham University. 
John Farrell comments that, ‘…the subject knowledge of staff and their ability to inspire students with such care is such a pleasure to observe’. Our staff have done a superb job in stretching students so they do their best and I would very much like to thank them all. We wish all are students leaving best wishes for their future at University, Apprenticeships or Employment.’
Well done in particular to the following subjects had an A*-B percentage of more than 50%: Applied Science, Business Studies, Dance, Economics, Fashion, Further Mathematics, Geography, Mathematics and Physics.  

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 408 other followers